Reading Comprehension – Despite their fierce reputation, Vikings

Reading Comprehension

The passage below is accompanied by a set of three questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

CAT 2017 - Afternoon slot - Reading Comprehension - Passage - Despite their fierce reputation, Vikings
Despite their fierce reputation. Vikings may not have always been the plunderers and pillagers popular culture imagines them to be. In fact, they got their start trading in northern European markets, researchers suggest.

Combs carved from animal antlers, as well as comb manufacturing waste and raw antler material has turned up at three archaeological sites in Denmark, including a medieval marketplace in the city of Ribe. A team of researchers from Denmark and the U.K. hoped to identify the species of animal to which the antlers once belonged by analyzing collagen proteins in the samples and comparing them across the animal kingdom, Laura Geggel reports for LiveScience. Somewhat surprisingly, molecular analysis of the artifacts revealed that some combs and other material had been carved from reindeer antlers…. Given that reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) don’t live in Denmark, the researchers posit that it arrived on Viking ships from Norway. Antler craftsmanship, in the form of decorative combs, was part of Viking culture. Such combs served as symbols of good health, Geggel writes. The fact that the animals shed their antlers also made them easy to collect from the large herds that inhabited Norway.

Since the artifacts were found in marketplace areas at each site it’s more likely that the Norsemen came to trade rather than pillage. Most of the artifacts also date to the 780s, but some are as old as 725. That predates the beginning of Viking raids on Great Britain by about 70 years. (Traditionally, the so-called “Viking Age” began with these raids in 793 and ended with the Norman conquest of Great Britain in 1066.) Archaeologists had suspected that the Vikings had experience with long maritime voyages [that] might have preceded their raiding days. Beyond Norway, these combs would have been a popular industry in Scandinavia as well. It’s possible that the antler combs represent a larger trade network, where the Norsemen supplied raw material to craftsmen in Denmark and elsewhere.

Questions

Q1) The primary purpose of the passage is:
A) to explain the presence of reindeer antler combs in Denmark.
B) to contradict the widely-accepted beginning date for the Viking Age in Britain, and propose an alternate one.
C) to challenge the popular perception of Vikings as raiders by using evidence that suggests their early trade relations with Europe.
D) to argue that besides being violent pillagers, Vikings were also skilled craftsmen and efficient traders.

Q2) The evidence – “Most of the artifacts also date to the 780s, but some are as old as 725” – has been used in the passage to argue that:
A) the beginning date of the Viking Age should be changed from 793 to 725.
B) the Viking raids started as early as 725.
C) some of the antler artifacts found in Denmark and Great Britain could have come from Scandinavia.
D) the Vikings’ trade relations with Europe pre-dates the Viking raids.

Q3) All of the following hold true for Vikings EXCEPT
A) Vikings brought reindeer from Norway to Denmark for trade purposes.
B) Before becoming the raiders of northern Europe, Vikings had trade relations with European nations.
C) Antler combs, regarded by the Vikings as a symbol of good health, were part of the Viking culture.
D) Vikings, once upon a. time, had trade relations with Denmark and Scandinavia.

Answers

Q1: Option (C)
Q2: Option (D)
Q3: Option (A)

Solutions

Q1)
As per the passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, Vikings have a reputation that they are plunderers and pillagers. The passage finds out the the other side of them, as traders.
Option C is the right answer.

Q2)
As per the passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, this has been used to show that Vikings began their trade relations with Europeans 70 years before they started raiding them.
Option D is the correct answer.

Q3)
As per the passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, Vikings brought reindeer antlers from Norway, not entire reindeers.
Option A is the right answer.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension – Set 1: Typewriters are the epitome of a technology that has been comprehensively rendered obsolete by the digital age.
Reading Comprehension – Set 2: The end of the age of the internal combustion engine is in sight. There are small signs everywhere
Reading Comprehension – Set 3: During the frigid season…it’s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm.
Reading Comprehension – Set 4: Creativity is at once our most precious resource and our most inexhaustible one.
Reading Comprehension – Set 5: Do sports mega events like the summer Olympic Games benefit the host city economically?
Reading Comprehension – Set 6: Scientists have long recognized the incredible diversity within a species.
Reading Comprehension – Set 7: This year alone, more than 8,600 stores could close, according to industry estimates, many of them the brand -name anchor outlets that real estate developers once stumbled over themselves to court.
Reading Comprehension – Set 8: I used a smartphone GPS to find my way through the cobblestoned maze of Geneva’s Old Town, in search of a handmade machine that changed the world more than any other invention.
Reading Comprehension – Set 9: Understanding where you are in the world is a basic survival skill, which is why we, like most species come hard-wired with specialized brain areas to create congnitive maps of our surroundings.

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Tones of Passages for Reading Comprehension Questions in CAT Exam

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c) Study Material & PDFs for practice and understanding
d) 10 Mock Tests in the latest pattern
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Reading Comprehension – Despite their fierce reputation, Vikings
5 (100%) 56 vote[s]

Reading Comprehension – Typewriters are the epitome of a technology

Reading Comprehension

The passage below is accompanied by a set of three questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

CAT 2017 - Afternoon slot - Reading Comprehension - Passage - Typewriters are the epitome of a technology
Typewriters are the epitome of a technology that has been comprehensively rendered obsolete by the digital age. The ink comes off the ribbon, they weigh a ton, and second thoughts are a disaster. But they are also personal, portable and, above all, private. Type a document and lock it away and more or less the only way anyone else can get it is if you give it to them. That is why the Russians have decided to go back to typewriters in some government offices, and why in the US, some departments have never abandoned them. Yet it is not just their resistance to algorithms and secret surveillance that keeps typewriter production lines – well one, at least – in business (the last British one closed a year ago). Nor is it only the nostalgic appeal of the metal body and the stout well-defined keys that make them popular on eBay. A typewriter demands something particular: attentiveness. By the time the paper is loaded, the ribbon tightened, the carriage returned, the spacing and the margins set, there’s a big premium on hitting the right key. That means sorting out ideas, pulling together a kind of order and organising details before actually striking off. There can be no thinking on screen with a typewriter. Nor are there any easy distractions. No online shopping. No urgent emails. No Twitter. No need even for electricity – perfect for writing in a remote hideaway. The thinking process is accompanied by the encouraging clack of keys, and the ratchet of the carriage return. Ping!

Questions

Q1) Which one of the following best describes what the passage is trying to do?
A) It describes why people continue to use typewriters even in the digital age.
B) It argues that typewriters will continue to be used even though they are an obsolete technology.
C) It highlights the personal benefits of using typewriters.uture.
D) It shows that computers offer fewer options than typewriters.

Q2) According to the passage, some governments still use typewriters because:
A) they do not want to abandon old technologies that may be useful in the future.
B) they want to ensure that typewriter production lines remain in business.
C) they like the nostalgic appeal of typewriter.
D) they can control who reads the document.

Q3) The writer praises typewriters for all the following reasons EXCEPT
A) Unlike computers, they can only be used for typing.
B) You cannot revise what you have typed on a typewriter.
C) Typewriters are noisier than computers.
D) Typewriters are messier to use than computers.

Answers

Q1: Option (A)
Q2: Option (D)
Q3: Option (D)

Solutions

Q1)
CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension
The passage states the reasons of why typewriters are used even in this digital age.
Option A is the correct answer.

Q2)
As per the passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, typewriters are secure, they cannot be hacked which is crucial for the important documents of the government. Governments can control who reads the document.
Option D is the correct answer.

Q3)
As per the passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, the author does not mention anywhere that typewriters are messy to use.
Option D is the right answer.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension – Set 1: Despite their fierce reputation. Vikings may not have always been the plunderers and pillagers popular culture imagines them to be.
Reading Comprehension – Set 2: The end of the age of the internal combustion engine is in sight. There are small signs everywhere
Reading Comprehension – Set 3: During the frigid season…it’s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm.
Reading Comprehension – Set 4: Creativity is at once our most precious resource and our most inexhaustible one.
Reading Comprehension – Set 5: Do sports mega events like the summer Olympic Games benefit the host city economically?
Reading Comprehension – Set 6: Scientists have long recognized the incredible diversity within a species.
Reading Comprehension – Set 7: This year alone, more than 8,600 stores could close, according to industry estimates, many of them the brand -name anchor outlets that real estate developers once stumbled over themselves to court.
Reading Comprehension – Set 8: I used a smartphone GPS to find my way through the cobblestoned maze of Geneva’s Old Town, in search of a handmade machine that changed the world more than any other invention.
Reading Comprehension – Set 9: Understanding where you are in the world is a basic survival skill, which is why we, like most species come hard-wired with specialized brain areas to create congnitive maps of our surroundings.

Other posts related to Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension Tips For CAT – Different Types of RC Passages
Reading Comprehension Tips – Writing Styles of Passages in CAT Exam
Tones of Passages for Reading Comprehension Questions in CAT Exam
​​

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a) 750+ Videos covering entire CAT syllabus
b) 2 Live Classes (online) every week for doubt clarification
c) Study Material & PDFs for practice and understanding
d) 10 Mock Tests in the latest pattern
e) Previous Year Questions solved on video

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Reading Comprehension – Typewriters are the epitome of a technology
5 (100%) 52 vote[s]

Reading Comprehension – The end of the age of the internal

Reading Comprehension – Passage

The passage below is accompanied by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

CAT 2017 - Afternoon slot - Reading Comprehension - Passage - The end of the age of the internal
The end of the age of the internal combustion engine is in sight. There are small signs everywhere: the shift to hybrid vehicles is already under way among manufacturers. Volvo has announced it will make no purely petrol-engined cars after 2019…and Tesla has just started selling its first electric car aimed squarely at the middle classes: the Tesla 3 sells for $35,000 in the US, and 400,000 people have put down a small, refundable deposit towards one. Several thousand have already taken delivery, and the company hopes to sell half a million more next year. This is a remarkable figure for a machine with a fairly short range and a very limited number of specialised charging stations.

Some of it reflects the remarkable abilities of Elon Musk, the company’s founder, as a salesman, engineer, and a man able to get the most out his factory workers and the governments he deals with…Mr Musk is selling a dream that the world wants to believe in.

This last may be the most important factor in the story. The private car is…a device of immense practical help and economic significance, but at the same time a theatre for myths of unattainable self-fulfilment. The one thing you will never see in a car advertisement is traffic, even though that is the element in which drivers spend their lives. Every single driver in a traffic jam is trying to escape from it, yet it is the inevitable consequence of mass car ownership.

The sleek and swift electric car is at one level merely the most contemporary fantasy of autonomy and power. But it might also disrupt our exterior landscapes nearly as much as the fossil fuel-engined car did in the last century. Electrical cars would of course pollute far less than fossil fuel-driven ones; instead of oil reserves, the rarest materials for batteries would make undeserving despots and their dynasties fantastically rich. Petrol stations would disappear. The air in cities would once more be breathable and their streets as quiet as those of Venice. This isn’t an unmixed good. Cars that were as silent as bicycles would still be as dangerous as they are now to anyone they hit without audible warning.

The dream goes further than that. The electric cars of the future will be so thoroughly equipped with sensors and reaction mechanisms that they will never hit anyone. Just as brakes don’t let you skid today, the steering wheel of tomorrow will swerve you away from danger before you have even noticed it…

This is where the fantasy of autonomy comes full circle. The logical outcome of cars which need no driver is that they will become cars which need no owner either. Instead, they will work as taxis do, summoned at will but only for the journeys we actually need. This the future towards which Uber…is working. The ultimate development of the private car will be to reinvent public transport. Traffic jams will be abolished only when the private car becomes a public utility. What then will happen to our fantasies of independence? We’ll all have to take to electrically powered bicycles.

Questions

Q1) Which of the following statements best reflects the author’s argument?
A) Hybrid and electric vehicles signal the end of the age of internal combustion engines.
B) Elon Musk is a remarkably gifted salesman.
C) The private car represents an unattainable myth of independence.
D) The future Uber car will be environmentally friendlier than even the Tesla.

Q2) The author points out all of the following about electric cars EXCEPT
A) Their reliance on rare materials for batteries will support despotic rule.
B) They will reduce air and noise pollution.
C) They will not decrease the number of traffic jams.
D) They will ultimately undermine rather than further driver autonomy.

Q3) According to the author, the main reason for Tesla’s remarkable sales is that
A) in the long run, the Tesla is more cost effective than fossil fuel-driven cars.
B) the US government has announced a tax subsidy for Tesla buyers.
C) the company is rapidly upscaling the number of specialised charging stations for customer convenience.
D) people believe in the autonomy represented by private cars.

Q4) The author comes to the conclusion that
A) car drivers will no longer own cars but will have to use public transport.
B) cars will be controlled by technology that is more efficient than car drivers.
C) car drivers dream of autonomy but the future may be public transport.
D) electrically powered bicycles are the only way to achieve autonomy in transportation

Q5) In paragraphs 5 and 6, the author provides the example of Uber to argue that
A) in the future, electric cars will be equipped with mechanisms that prevent collisions.
B) in the future, traffic jams will not exist.
C) in the future, the private car will be transformed into a form of public transport.
D) in the future, Uber rides will outstrip Tesla sales.

Q6) In paragraph 6, the author mentions electrically powered bicycles to argue that
A) if Elon Musk were a true visionary, he would invest funds in developing electric bicycles.
B) our fantasies of autonomy might unexpectedly require us to consider electric bicycles.
C) in terms of environmental friendliness and safety, electric bicycles rather than electric cars are the future.
D) electric buses are the best form of public transport.

Answers

Q1: Option (C)
Q2: Option (D)
Q3: Option (D)
Q4: Option (C)
Q5: Option (C)
Q6: Option (B)

Solutions

Q1)
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, as privatization of cars will increase, traffic will also increase that every driver tries to escape from. Traffic jams can only be avoided when private cars become a public utility. Traffic jams refrain us from independence and independence will only be a myth till private cars are used by everyone.
Option C is the right answer.

Q2
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, from the last paragraph we can see that with future cars, the fantasy of autonomy will come a full circle. They will work as taxis, that can be summoned anytime.
So, instead of undermining driver autonomy they will further it.
Option D is the right answer.

Q3
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, the world dreams of having full autonomy and Tesla is providing that which is the reason for Tesla’s remarkable sales.
Option D is the right answer.

Q4
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension ,the author says that as the number of private cars increase, there will be more traffic jam and the dream of independence will only be a myth. The myth can only be achieved if private cars are become a public utility.
Option C is the right answer.

Q5)
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, in the last paragraph, the author says through the sentence “The logical outcome of cars which need no driver is that they will need no owner either” which means that they will become public transport.
Option (C)

Q6)
As per the last paragraph from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, “Traffic jams will be abolished only when the car becomes a public utility. What will happen to our fantasies of independence? We will all have to take to electrically powered bicycles”. Since independence and autonomy are synonymous, the author suggests that we will need to consider bicycles if we want autonomy.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension – Set 1: Despite their fierce reputation. Vikings may not have always been the plunderers and pillagers popular culture imagines them to be.
Reading Comprehension – Set 2: Typewriters are the epitome of a technology that has been comprehensively rendered obsolete by the digital age.
Reading Comprehension – Set 3: During the frigid season…it’s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm.
Reading Comprehension – Set 4: Creativity is at once our most precious resource and our most inexhaustible one.
Reading Comprehension – Set 5: Do sports mega events like the summer Olympic Games benefit the host city economically?
Reading Comprehension – Set 6: Scientists have long recognized the incredible diversity within a species.
Reading Comprehension – Set 7: This year alone, more than 8,600 stores could close, according to industry estimates, many of them the brand -name anchor outlets that real estate developers once stumbled over themselves to court.
Reading Comprehension – Set 8: I used a smartphone GPS to find my way through the cobblestoned maze of Geneva’s Old Town, in search of a handmade machine that changed the world more than any other invention.
Reading Comprehension – Set 9: Understanding where you are in the world is a basic survival skill, which is why we, like most species come hard-wired with specialized brain areas to create congnitive maps of our surroundings.

Other posts related to Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension Tips For CAT – Different Types of RC Passages
Reading Comprehension Tips – Writing Styles of Passages in CAT Exam
Tones of Passages for Reading Comprehension Questions in CAT Exam

Online Coaching Course for CAT Exam Preparation

a) 750+ Videos covering entire CAT syllabus
b) 2 Live Classes (online) every week for doubt clarification
c) Study Material & PDFs for practice and understanding
d) 10 Mock Tests in the latest pattern
e) Previous Year Questions solved on video

Know More about Online CAT Course

Reading Comprehension – The end of the age of the internal
5 (100%) 53 vote[s]

Reading Comprehension – During the frigid season….

Reading Comprehension – Passage

The passage below is accompanied by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

CAT 2017 - Afternoon slot - Reading Comprehension - Passage - During the frigid season....
During the frigid season…it’s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm. The temperature difference between the blanket and the air outside is so palpable that we often have trouble leaving our warm refuge. Many plants and animals similarly hunker down, relying on snow cover for safety from winter’s harsh conditions. The small area between the snowpack and the ground, called the subnivium…might be the most important ecosystem that you have never heard of.

The subnivium is so well-insulated and stable that its temperature holds steady at around 32 degree Fahrenheit (0 degree Celsius). Although that might still sound cold, a constant temperature of 32 degree Fahrenheit can often be 30 to 40 degrees warmer than the air temperature during the peak of winter. Because of this large temperature difference, a wide variety of species…depend on the subnivium for winter protection.

For many organisms living in temperate and Arctic regions, the difference between being under the snow or outside it is a matter of life and death. Consequently, disruptions to the subnivium brought about by climate change will affect everything from population dynamics to nutrient cycling through the ecosystem.

The formation and stability of the subnivium requires more than a few flurries. Winter ecologists have suggested that eight inches of snow is necessary to develop a stable layer of insulation. Depth is not the only factor, however. More accurately, the stability of the subnivium depends on the interaction between snow depth and snow density. Imagine being under a stack of blankets that are all flattened and pressed together. When compressed, the blankets essentially form one compacted layer. In contrast, when they are lightly placed on top of one another, their insulative capacity increases because the air pockets between them trap heat. Greater depths of low-density snow are therefore better at insulating the ground.

Both depth and density of snow are sensitive to temperature. Scientists are now beginning to explore how climate change will affect the subnivium, as well as the species that depend on it. At first glance, warmer winters seem beneficial for species that have difficulty surviving subzero temperatures; however, as with most ecological phenomena, the consequences are not so straightforward. Research has shown that the snow season (the period when snow is more likely than rain) has become shorter since 1970. When rain falls on snow, it increases the density of the snow and reduces its insulative capacity. Therefore, even though winters are expected to become warmer overall from future climate change, the subnivium will tend to become colder and more variable with less protection from the above-ground temperatures.

The effects of a colder subnivium are complex…For example, shrubs such as crowberry and alpine azalea that grow along the forest floor tend to block the wind and so retain higher depths of snow around them. This captured snow helps to keep soils insulated and in turn increases plant decomposition and nutrient release. In field experiments, researchers removed a portion of the snow cover to investigate the importance of the subnivium’s insulation. They found that soil frost in the snow-free area resulted in damage to plant roots and sometimes even the death of the plant.

Questions

Q1) The purpose of this passage is to
A) introduce readers to a relatively unknown ecosystem: the subnivium
B) explain how the subnivium works to provide shelter and food to several species.
C) outline the effects of climate change on the subnivium.
D) draw an analogy between the effect of blankets on humans and of snow cover on species living in the subnivium.

Q2) All of the following statements are true EXCEPT
A) Snow depth and snow density both influence the stability of the subnivium.
B) Climate change has some positive effects on the subnivium.
C) The subnivium maintains a steady temperature that can be 30 to 40 degrees warmer than the winter air temperature.
D) Researchers have established the adverse effects of dwindling snow cover on the subnivium.

Q3) Based on this extract, the author would support which one of the following actions?
A) The use of snow machines in winter to ensure snow cover of at least eight inches.
B) Government action to curb climate change.
C) Adding nutrients to the soil in winter.
D) Planting more shrubs in areas of short snow season

Q4) In paragraph 6, the author provides the examples of crowberry and alpine azalea to demonstrate that
A) Despite frigid temperatures, several species survive in temperate and Arctic regions.
B) Due to frigid temperatures in the temperate and Arctic regions., plant species that survive tend to be shrubs rather than trees.
C) The crowberry and alpine azalea are abundant in temperate and Arctic regions.
D) The stability of the subnivium depends on several interrelated factors, including shrubs on the forest floor.

Q5) Which one of the following statements can be inferred from the passage?
A) In an ecosystem, altering any one element has a ripple effect on all others.
B) Climate change affects temperate and Artie regions more than equatorial or arid ones.
C) A compact layer of wool is warmer than a similarly compact layer of goose down.
D) The loss of the subnivium, while tragic, will affect only temperate and Artie regions.

Q6) In paragraph 1, the author uses blankets as a device to
A) evoke the bitter cold of winter in the minds of readers.
B) explain how blankets work to keep us warm.
C) draw an analogy between blankets and the snowpack.
D) alert readers to the fatal effects of excessive exposure to the cold.

Answers

Q1: Option (C)
Q2: Option (B)
Q3: Option (B)
Q4: Option (D)
Q5: Option (A)
Q6: Option (C)

Solutions

Q1)
CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension
After reading the passage, it can be concluded that the purpose of the passage is to outline the effects of climate change on the subnivium.
Option (C) is the right answer.

Q2)
From CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, as climate change occurs, subnivium will become colder and hence provide less protection from above – ground temperatures (Refer 2nd last paragraph). Climate change will not have a positive effect on subnivium.
Option (B) is the correct answer.

Q3)
From CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, author will favor if govt takes action to curb climate change as it is affecting subnivium negatively which sometimes leads to the death of plants and nutrient release.
Option (B) is the right answer.

Q4)
From CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, the shrubs block the wind and retain higher depths of snow around them which in turn, keeps the soil insulated. (Refer last paragraph)
So, stability of subnivium depends on several interdependent factors.
Option D is the right answer.

Q5)
CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension
It can be seen from the paragraph that there are a lot of interrelated factors that if altered can cause impact on all others. Like climate change creates a very substantial impact on the subnivium.
Option (A) is the right answer.

Q6)
CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension
To demonstrate why low-density snow is better at insulating the ground.
Option (C) is the right answer.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension – Set 1: Despite their fierce reputation. Vikings may not have always been the plunderers and pillagers popular culture imagines them to be.
Reading Comprehension – Set 2: Typewriters are the epitome of a technology that has been comprehensively rendered obsolete by the digital age.
Reading Comprehension – Set 3: The end of the age of the internal combustion engine is in sight. There are small signs everywhere: the shift to hybrid vehicles is already under way among manufacturers.
Reading Comprehension – Set 4: Creativity is at once our most precious resource and our most inexhaustible one.
Reading Comprehension – Set 5: Do sports mega events like the summer Olympic Games benefit the host city economically?
Reading Comprehension – Set 6: Scientists have long recognized the incredible diversity within a species.
Reading Comprehension – Set 7: This year alone, more than 8,600 stores could close, according to industry estimates, many of them the brand -name anchor outlets that real estate developers once stumbled over themselves to court.
Reading Comprehension – Set 8: I used a smartphone GPS to find my way through the cobblestoned maze of Geneva’s Old Town, in search of a handmade machine that changed the world more than any other invention.
Reading Comprehension – Set 9: Understanding where you are in the world is a basic survival skill, which is why we, like most species come hard-wired with specialized brain areas to create congnitive maps of our surroundings.

Other posts related to Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension Tips For CAT – Different Types of RC Passages
Reading Comprehension Tips – Writing Styles of Passages in CAT Exam
Tones of Passages for Reading Comprehension Questions in CAT Exam

Online Coaching Course for CAT Exam Preparation

a) 750+ Videos covering entire CAT syllabus
b) 2 Live Classes (online) every week for doubt clarification
c) Study Material & PDFs for practice and understanding
d) 10 Mock Tests in the latest pattern
e) Previous Year Questions solved on video

Know More about Online CAT Course

Reading Comprehension – During the frigid season….
5 (100%) 60 vote[s]

Reading Comprehension – Passage – Creativity is at once our most precious

Reading Comprehension – Passage

The passage below is accompanied by a set of six questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

CAT 2017 - Afternoon slot - Reading Comprehension - Creativity is at once our most precious
Creativity is at once our most precious resource and our most inexhaustible one. As anyone who has ever spent any time with children knows, every single human being is born creative; every human being is innately endowed with the ability to combine and recombine data, perceptions, materials and ideas, and devise new ways of thinking and doing. What fosters creativity? More than anything else: the presence of other creative people. The big myth is that creativity is the province of great individual geniuses. In fact creativity is a social process. Our biggest creative breakthroughs come when people learn from, compete with, and collaborate with other people.

Cities are the true fonts of creativity… With their diverse populations, dense social networks, and public spaces where people can meet spontaneously and serendipitously, they spark and catalyze new ideas. With their infrastructure for finance, organization and trade, they allow those ideas to be swiftly actualized.

As for what staunches creativity, that’s easy, if ironic. It’s the very institutions that we build to manage, exploit and perpetuate the fruits of creativity — our big bureaucracies, and sad to say, too many of our schools. Creativity is disruptive; schools and organizations are regimented, standardized and stultifying.

The education expert Sir Ken Robinson points to a 1968 study reporting on a group of 1,600 children who were tested over time for their ability to think in out-of-the-box ways. When the children were between 3 and 5 years old, 98 percent achieved positive scores. When they were 8 to 10, only 32 percent passed the same test, and only 10 percent at 13 to 15. When 280,000 25-year-olds took the test, just 2 percent passed. By the time we are adults, our creativity has been wrung out of us.

I once asked the great urbanist Jane Jacobs what makes some places more creative than others. She said, essentially, that the question was an easy one. All cities, she said, were filled with creative people; that’s our default state as people. But some cities had more than their shares of leaders, people and institutions that blocked out that creativity. She called them “squelchers.”

Creativity (or the lack of it) follows the same general contours of the great socio-economic divide – our rising inequality – that plagues us. According to my own estimates, roughly a third of us across the United States, and perhaps as much as half of us in our most creative cities – are able to do work which engages our creative faculties to some extent, whether as artists, musicians, writers, techies, innovators, entrepreneurs, doctors, lawyers, journalists or educators – those of us who work with our minds. That leaves a group that I term “the other 66 percent,” who toil in low-wage rote and rotten jobs — if they have jobs at all — in which their creativity is subjugated, ignored or wasted.

Creativity itself is not in danger. It’s flourishing is all around us – in science and technology, arts and culture, in our rapidly revitalizing cities. But we still have a long way to go if we want to build a truly creative society that supports and rewards the creativity of each and every one of us.

Questions

Q1) In the author’s view, cities promote human creativity for all the following reasons EXCEPT that they
A) contain spaces that enable people to meet and share new ideas.
B) expose people to different and novel ideas, because they are home to varied groups of people.
C) provide the financial and institutional networks that enable ideas to become reality.
D) provide access to cultural activities that promote new and creative ways of thinking.

Q2) The author uses ‘ironic’ in the third paragraph to point out that
A) people need social contact rather than isolation to nurture their creativity
B) institutions created to promote creativity eventually stifle it
C) the larger the creative population in a city, the more likely it is to be stifled
D) large bureaucracies and institutions are the inevitable outcome of successful cities

Q3) The central idea of this passage is that
A) social interaction is necessary to nurture creativity
B) creativity and ideas are gradually declining in all societies
C) the creativity divide is widening in societies in line with socio-economic trends
D) more people should work in jobs that engage their creative faculties

Q4) Jane Jacobs believed that cities that are more creative
A) have to struggle to retain their creativity
B) have to ‘squelch’ unproductive people and promote creative ones
C) have leaders and institutions that do not block creativity
D) typically do not start off as creative hubs

Q5) The 1968 study is used here to show that
A) as they get older, children usually learn to be more creative
B) schooling today does not encourage creative thinking in children
C) the more children learn, the less creative they become
D) technology today prevents children from being creative.

Q6) The author’s conclusions about the most ‘creative cities’ in the US (paragraph 6) are based on his assumption that
A) people who work with their hands are not doing creative work.
B) more than half the population works in non-creative jobs.
C) only artists, musicians., writers., and so on should be valued in a society.
D) most cities ignore or waste the creativity of low-wage workers

Answers

Q1: Option (D)
Q2: Option (B)
Q3: Option (A)
Q4: Option (C)
Q5: Option (B)
Q6: Option (A)

Solutions

Q1)
CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension
From paragraph 2, we can see that cities provide public spaces where people can meet and share new ideas and have institutions for finance, organization and trade. Cultural activities are not mentioned.
Option D is the correct answer.

Q2)
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, although institutions are built to foster creativity, on the contrary they stifle creativity as schools as organizations are regimented, standardized and stultifying which is ironic.
Option B is the correct answer.

Q3)
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, most of us believe that creativity is only restricted to some people but in the 1st paragraph author states that creativity is a social process.
Option (A) is the right answer.

Q4)
CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension
In paragraph 5, Jane Jacobs says that all cities have people full of creativity. But some cities had less because of leaders, people and institutions that blocked out that creativity.
As per her argument, cities that are more creative have leaders and institutions that do not block creativity.
Option (C) is the right answer.

Q5)
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, the study of 1968 shows that as people grew older their creativity vanished which is a result of schooling.
Option (B) is the right answer.

Q6)
As per the above passage from CAT 2017 – Reading Comprehension, we can see that, low-wage and rotten jobs refer to jobs that do not involve any thinking and need to be done with hands which means no creativity is used.
Option (A) is the right answer.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension – Set 1: Despite their fierce reputation. Vikings may not have always been the plunderers and pillagers popular culture imagines them to be.
Reading Comprehension – Set 2: Typewriters are the epitome of a technology that has been comprehensively rendered obsolete by the digital age.
Reading Comprehension – Set 3: The end of the age of the internal combustion engine is in sight. There are small signs everywhere: the shift to hybrid vehicles is already under way among manufacturers.
Reading Comprehension – Set 4: During the frigid season…it’s often necessary to nestle under a blanket to try to stay warm.
Reading Comprehension – Set 5: Do sports mega events like the summer Olympic Games benefit the host city economically?
Reading Comprehension – Set 6: Scientists have long recognized the incredible diversity within a species.
Reading Comprehension – Set 7: This year alone, more than 8,600 stores could close, according to industry estimates, many of them the brand -name anchor outlets that real estate developers once stumbled over themselves to court.
Reading Comprehension – Set 8: I used a smartphone GPS to find my way through the cobblestoned maze of Geneva’s Old Town, in search of a handmade machine that changed the world more than any other invention.
Reading Comprehension – Set 9: Understanding where you are in the world is a basic survival skill, which is why we, like most species come hard-wired with specialized brain areas to create congnitive maps of our surroundings.

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Reading Comprehension – Passage – Creativity is at once our most precious
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Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – The water that made up ancient lakes

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q3

Five sentences related to a topic are given below. Four of them can be put together to form a meaningful and coherent short paragraph. Identify the odd one out.

Question

1. The water that made up ancient lakes and perhaps an ocean was lost.

2. Particles from the Sun collided with molecules in the atmosphere, knocking them into space or giving them an electric charge that caused them to be swept away by the solar wind.

3. Most of the planet’s remaining water is now frozen or buried, but clues over the past decade suggested that some liquid water, a presumed necessity for life, might survive in underground aquifers.

4. Data from NASA’s MAVEN orbiter show that solar storms stripped away most of Mars’s once-thick atmosphere.

5. A recent study reveals how Mars lost much of its early water, while another indicates that some liquid water remains

Answer

1

Solution

After reading all the statements from CAT 2017 – Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q3, we can infer that, Statements 2, 3, 4 and 5 talk about water on Mars.
Option 1 is the odd one out.

CAT 2017 Questions from Verbal Ability – Odd One Out

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q1: Those geometric symbols and aerodynamic swooshes are more than just skin deep.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q2: Over the past fortnight, one of its finest champions managed to pull off a similar impression.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q3: Although we are born with the gift of language, research shows that we are surprisingly unskilled when it comes to communicating with others.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q4: Neuroscientists have just begun studying exercise’s impact within brain cells — on the genes themselves.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q5: People who study children’s language spend a lot of time watching how babies react to the speech they hear around them.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

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Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – The water that made up ancient lakes
5 (100%) 55 vote[s]

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Neuroscientists have just begun

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q2

Five sentences related to a topic are given below. Four of them can be put together to form a meaningful and coherent short paragraph. Identify the odd one out.

Question

CAT 2017 - Forenoon slot - Verbal Ability - Odd One Out - Neuroscientists have just begun
1. Neuroscientists have just begun studying exercise’s impact within brain cells — on the genes themselves.

2. Even there, in the roots of our biology, they’ve found signs of the body’s influence on the mind.

3. It turns out that moving our muscles produces proteins that travel through the bloodstream and into the brain, where they play pivotal roles in the mechanisms of our highest thought processes.

4. In today’s technology-driven, plasma-screened-in world, it’s easy to forget that we are born movers — animals, in fact — because we’ve engineered movement right out of our lives.

5. It’s only in the past few years that neuroscientists have begun to describe these factors and how they work, and each new discovery adds awe-inspiring depth to the picture

Answer

4

Solution

After reading all the statements from CAT 2017 – Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q2, we can infer that, Statements 1, 2, 3 and 5 talk about how exercising impacts brain cells. Statement 4 goes off the track by saying that we have forgotten that we are born movers.
Statement 4 is the odd one out.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Verbal Ability – Odd One Out

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q1: Those geometric symbols and aerodynamic swooshes are more than just skin deep.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q2: Over the past fortnight, one of its finest champions managed to pull off a similar impression.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q3: Although we are born with the gift of language, research shows that we are surprisingly unskilled when it comes to communicating with others.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q4: The water that made up ancient lakes and perhaps an ocean was lost.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q5: People who study children’s language spend a lot of time watching how babies react to the speech they hear around them.

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Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Neuroscientists have just begun
5 (100%) 54 vote[s]

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – People who study children’s language

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out

Five sentences related to a topic are given below. Four of them can be put together to form a meaningful and coherent short paragraph. Identify the odd one out.

Question

CAT 2017 - Forenoon slot - Verbal Ability - Odd One Out - People who study children's language
1. People who study children’s language spend a lot of time watching how babies react to the speech they hear around them.

2. They make films of adults and babies interacting, and examine them very carefully to see whether the babies show any signs of understanding what the adults say.

3. They believe that babies begin to react to language from the very moment they are born.

4. Sometimes the signs are very subtle – slight movements of the baby’s eyes or the head or the hands.

5. You’d never notice them if you were just sitting with the child, but by watching a recording over and over, you can spot them.

Answer

3

Solution

After reading all the statements from CAT 2017 – Verbal Ability – Odd One Out, we can infer that, Statements 1, 2, 4 and 5 talk about how people study children’s language. Statement 3 goes off the track by saying that babies can understand language.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Verbal Ability – Odd One Out

Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q1: Those geometric symbols and aerodynamic swooshes are more than just skin deep.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q2: Over the past fortnight, one of its finest champions managed to pull off a similar impression.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q3: Although we are born with the gift of language, research shows that we are surprisingly unskilled when it comes to communicating with others.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q4: The water that made up ancient lakes and perhaps an ocean was lost.
Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – Q5: Neuroscientists have just begun studying exercise’s impact within brain cells — on the genes themselves.

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Verbal Ability – Odd One Out – People who study children’s language
5 (100%) 54 vote[s]

Verbal Ability – Parajumble – This visual turn in social media

Verbal Ability – Parajumble – Q4

The five sentences (labelled 1,2,3,4,5) given in this question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a number. Decide on the proper order for the sentences to solve the parajumble.

Question

CAT 2017 - Forenoon slot - Verbal Ability - Parajumble - This visual turn in social media
1. This visual turn in social media has merely accentuated this announcing instinct of ours, enabling us with easy-to-create, easy-to-share, easy-to-store and easy-to-consume platforms, gadgets and apps.

2. There is absolutely nothing new about us framing the vision of who we are or what we want, visually or otherwise, in our Facebook page, for example.

3. Turning the pages of most family albums, which belong to a period well before the digital dissemination of self-created and self-curated moments and images, would reconfirm the basic instinct of documenting our presence in a particular space, on a significant occasion, with others who matter.

4. We are empowered to book our faces and act as celebrities within the confinement of our respective friend lists, and communicate our activities, companionship and locations with minimal clicks and touches.

5. What is unprecedented is not the desire to put out news feeds related to the self, but the ease with which this broadcast operation can now be executed, often provoking (un)anticipated responses from beyond one’s immediate location.

Answer

32145

Solution

After reading all the statements from CAT 2017 – Verbal Ability – Parajumble – Q4, we can infer that, Statement 1 gives the introduction about the basic instincts that humans have always had to make their presence felt. Statement 2 sets a premise for Statement 1 by mentioning Facebook. Statement 1 talks about how visual media has accentuated the basic instinct of ours furthered by Statement 4. Statement 5 is the conclusion worrying about the consequences of this trend.
32145 is the right answer.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Verbal Ability – Parajumbles

Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q1: Johnson treated English very practically, as a living language, with many different shades of meaning and adopted his definitions on the principle of English common law – according to precedent.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q2: This has huge implications for the health care system as it operates today, where depleted resources and time lead to patients rotating in and out of doctor’s offices, oftentimes receiving minimal care or concern (what is commonly referred to as “bed side manner”) from doctors.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q3: Before plants can take life from atmosphere, nitrogen must undergo transformations similar to ones that food undergoes in our digestive machinery.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q4: The implications of retelling of Indian stories, hence, takes on new meaning in a modern India.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q5: The study suggests that the disease did not spread with such intensity, but that it may have driven human migrations across Europe and Asia.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q6: Scientists have for the first time managed to edit genes in a human embryo to repair a genetic mutation, fuelling hopes that such procedures may one day be available outside laboratory conditions.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q7: The process of handing down implies not a passive transfer, but some contestation in defining what exactly is to be handed down.

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​​

Online Coaching Course for CAT Exam Preparation

a) 750+ Videos covering entire CAT syllabus
b) 2 Live Classes (online) every week for doubt clarification
c) Study Material & PDFs for practice and understanding
d) 10 Mock Tests in the latest pattern
e) Previous Year Questions solved on video

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Verbal Ability – Parajumble – This visual turn in social media
5 (100%) 54 vote[s]

Verbal Ability – Parajumble – The study suggests that the disease

Verbal Ability – Parajumble – Q3

The five sentences (labelled 1,2,3,4,5) given in this question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labelled with a number. Decide on the proper order for the sentences to solve the parajumble.

Question

CAT 2017 - Forenoon slot - Verbal Ability - Parajumble - The study suggests that the disease
1. The study suggests that the disease did not spread with such intensity, but that it may have driven human migrations across Europe and Asia.

2. The oldest sample came from an individual who lived in southeast Russia about 5,000 years ago.

3. The ages of the skeletons correspond to a time of mass exodus from today’s Russia and Ukraine into Western Europe and central Asia, suggesting that a pandemic could have driven these migrations.

4. In the analysis of fragments of DNA from 101 Bronze Age skeletons for sequences from Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes the disease, seven tested positive.

5. DNA from Bronze Age human skeletons indicate that the black plague could have emerged as early as 3,000 BCE, long before the epidemic that swept through Europe in the mid-1300s.

Answer

54123

Solution

After reading all the statements from CAT 2017 – Verbal Ability – Parajumble – Q3, we can infer that, Statement 5 introduces the disease “Black Plague”. Statement 4 furthers this discussion. Statements 1, 2 and 3 tell us how the disease must have spread to Europe and Asia.
54123 is the right answer.

Download CAT 2017 Question Paper with answers and detailed solutions in PDF

CAT 2017 Questions from Verbal Ability – Parajumbles

Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q1: Johnson treated English very practically, as a living language, with many different shades of meaning and adopted his definitions on the principle of English common law – according to precedent.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q2: This has huge implications for the health care system as it operates today, where depleted resources and time lead to patients rotating in and out of doctor’s offices, oftentimes receiving minimal care or concern (what is commonly referred to as “bed side manner”) from doctors.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q3: Before plants can take life from atmosphere, nitrogen must undergo transformations similar to ones that food undergoes in our digestive machinery.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q4: The implications of retelling of Indian stories, hence, takes on new meaning in a modern India.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q5: This visual turn in social media has merely accentuated this announcing instinct of ours, enabling us with easy-to-create, easy-to-share, easy-to-store and easy-to-consume platforms, gadgets and apps.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q6: Scientists have for the first time managed to edit genes in a human embryo to repair a genetic mutation, fuelling hopes that such procedures may one day be available outside laboratory conditions.
Verbal Ability – Parajumbles – Q7: The process of handing down implies not a passive transfer, but some contestation in defining what exactly is to be handed down.

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What Sherlock Holmes can teach you about Parajumbles in CAT
Tips and Tricks to Solve Para-Jumble Questions for CAT 2017
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Let Sherlock Holmes help you solve Sentence Exclusion questions in CAT
Fact Inference Judgement – Tips to Solve FIJ Questions in CAT 2018
How to solve problem on Syllogism in CAT Exam
Critical Reasoning Tips – Strengthening and Weakening Arguments
How to correctly use the punctuation marks in English

​​

Online Coaching Course for CAT Exam Preparation

a) 750+ Videos covering entire CAT syllabus
b) 2 Live Classes (online) every week for doubt clarification
c) Study Material & PDFs for practice and understanding
d) 10 Mock Tests in the latest pattern
e) Previous Year Questions solved on video

Know More about Online CAT Course

Verbal Ability – Parajumble – The study suggests that the disease
5 (100%) 54 vote[s]