What ‘Exasperating farrago of distortions’ and Shashi Tharoor can teach you about Vocabulary Preparation for CAT

May 12th, 2017 by

A couple of days ago, 'The Republic' was unleashed on India and my opinion about Arnab as a journalist is quite similar to my opinion about Chetan Bhagat as a writer. But then, who am I to question or even criticize the role-model of the masses. During the last week, a role-model of the classes came under fire - Mr. Dr. Shashi Tharoor. There are allegations of wrongdoing about his involvement in the death of his wife, Sunanda Pushkar. Somehow, the very serious allegations were ignored and what caught the attention of social media in general, twitterati in specific, was Shashi's reactionary

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Cat Idioms for the CAT exam (and also for IIFT, XAT, SNAP etc.)

April 26th, 2017 by

In the last post Important Idioms and Phrases for CAT and other exams, we looked at some important idioms and phrases for CAT and other exams. Again, knowing this will not suddenly put you on track to ace the verbal section, but where it will help is you may spend fewer seconds trying to understand what a particular sentence means. What better way to take this forward than by talking about cats. It is not just now that cats are popular - viral cat videos and GIFs I’m looking at you. Even years ago, cats were popular and perhaps this is why we quite a few idioms around cats. Be

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Important Idioms and Phrases for CAT and other exams

April 14th, 2017 by

Let’s start with the basic question - what exactly is the difference between an idiom and proverb? Are they the same? If you say, “at loggerheads” instead of “strong disagreement among people,” you're using an idiom. The meaning of an idiom is different from the actual meaning of the words used. “Make hay while the sun shines” is a proverb. Proverbs are old but familiar sayings that usually give advice. A phrase is just a group of words. If you know the meaning of the individual words in a phrase, you know the meaning it conveys. But in an idiom, the meaning is not c

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