Difficult to understand words from news, politics and society

May 3rd, 2017 by

If you are a regular consumer of news, there are a lot of words that people keep using especially on social media - nationalist, feminist, racist, etc. You may have heard of these words, but do you know what these actually mean? In this post, we will look at some of the most popular ‘-isms’ doing rounds these days. The idea is to better understand the meaning and usage so that you can use it in the correct manner. unlike news channel panelists or social media revolutionaries. A more important reason is as an aspirant you must be clear with these terms. You may find these words in

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How to Approach Group Tasks, Extempore, and Pictorial WAT

March 19th, 2017 by

Group Tasks, though not as common as group discussions and WATs, present us with challenges of their own kind. A group task aims to evaluate the candidate on psychological parameters so that the evaluators can understand the candidates’ comprehension, communication, decision making, and leadership quality within the dynamic context of a group. Working in a group, the candidates also demonstrate their social and interpersonal skills to the panel. The objective of a group task is to perform a clearly-defined exercise within the stipulated time, by using the available resources and en

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Seven Deadly Sins of Personal Interview, and the Eighth

March 1st, 2017 by

I must have interviewed at least a few thousand candidates in my time. Every time I feel that I have seen it all and I have met them all, a Higher Power Up There intervenes and restores my humility by presenting a sample that I have never seen before. I share with readers these samples in the (absolutely vain) hope that they will not repeat these cases, and make their own new mistakes so that my life remains exciting. I just pray that you make those new mistakes in the mock interviews and not in the actual ones! Sin No 1: Negative Body language and Attitude: This includes sl

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How to Approach the Common Personal Interview Questions

February 28th, 2017 by

Most of the questions that one encounters in a B-school personal interview can be classified into the following categories: A – Introductory questions B – Academic and work-experience related questions C – Current affairs and general awareness questions D – Personality-based questions E – Goal-related questions F – Stress questions Let us begin by looking at these types, and the common questions that are asked under each type. Please note that while most interviews begin with introductory questions, no particular order of question types is followed by the panel as regard

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How to Present Yourself during the Personal Interview

February 26th, 2017 by

Having looked at the pre-interview preparation in the previous post, we can now focus on what happens in the initial stages of the personal interview. There is one factor of your PI performance that invariably shapes your first impression in the minds of the panellists even before they meet you. Can you imagine what it is? It’s not your CAT score, or your academic scores, or your work-experience, or your hobbies and interests. It is your punctuality. Whether or not you turn up on time for the interview greatly influences not only the panel’s first impression but also your own

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The Homework before the Personal Interview

February 24th, 2017 by

Let us get something very clear at the start of our discussion on the personal interview round. PI is difficult. Very difficult. This is the first and the last time the college gets to interact with you before they take a call on your candidature. Therefore they will do whatever is necessary – including testing you in ways you simply have not imagined – to ascertain that you are the right candidate for a seat in their college. The greater the competition at a particular institute, the tougher the PI, and the more the unexpected questions. The second factor that complicates the

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Seven Deadly Sins of Essay Writing

February 22nd, 2017 by

First thing first, when it comes to essay writing, there could potentially be 700 deadly sins. However, space and time constraints dictate that I resist the perennial, evil temptation of writing another long-winded piece and confine myself to the top seven that lead the line-up. These seven mistakes feature routinely in majority of the essays that I assess, and often a single essay contains all of them in varying degrees. So here I go with the seven deadlies in no particular order of frequency or seriousness. Sin No 1: Irrelevance This one is a two-faced devil and both equally ugl

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How Many Essays You Must Write Before You Write an Essay

February 21st, 2017 by

When I said in the previous post that you must write at least 100 essays, I was not joking. There are a number of reasons why this must be done. First, writing, unlike speaking or reading, is not a natural process we follow every day. Therefore, when we sit down to write, we are filled with self-doubt. Second, every writer, on most occasions, needs to motivate themselves to write. In the case of a WAT taker, the perceived disincentive for writing a bad essay outweighs the perceived incentive for writing a good essay. In other words, most WAT takers feel that a bad essay can do more

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The Five-step Process of Writing a WAT Essay

February 6th, 2017 by

If we all had the right guidance, the requisite reference material at hand, and unlimited time to write and revise the essays that we write, quite a few of us would eventually be able to produce satisfactory essays. The same task becomes infinitely more difficult when it is presented in the form of the WAT, which must be accomplished in approximately 15 minutes, and which must be produced entirely from references in one’s memory. When we are ultimately faced with the final WAT assignment and a blank paper, several factors begin to weigh heavy on our minds. There is the complexity of th

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Written Ability Test – Evaluation Criteria and Recommended Background Reading

February 4th, 2017 by

Over the last few years, most of the top B-schools have switched over from group discussion to writing ability test (WAT). There are compelling reasons why this has happened. It will be prudent to understand them before we begin our preparation for the WAT. The most important reason, I feel, behind this change is that, unlike in GDs, in an essay it is impossible to borrow the content from anyone else or further develop someone else’s thoughts. You must entirely depend on your own content and reasoning. In fact, GDs are meant to test your ability to assimilate diverse points of view along

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